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Trivia Questions: increase your knowledge
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TOPIC: Trivia Questions: increase your knowledge

Re: Trivia Questions: increase your knowledge 10 months ago #16688

Correct. She was not called Big Mama for nothing! Here is an article I found written by of all people, a bank files.constantcontact.com/10f0b894201/21...a33-c38cc8267285.pdf


"Don't write anything you can phone. Don't phone anything you can talk. Don't talk anything you can whisper. Don't whisper anything you can smile. Don't smile anything you can nod. Don't nod anything you can wink." Earl Long

Re: Trivia Questions: increase your knowledge 10 months ago #16690

Pan Am Boeing 314

Re: Trivia Questions: increase your knowledge 10 months ago #16691

Yes Richard, the first commercial airliner to fly around the world was a Boeing 314 plane operated by Pan-Am and started out as the California Clipper but ended up as the Pacific Clipper.

The round the world flight was not planned in the least but became a product of necessity possibly for life and limb. This would make a great movie, in my opinion.

The Boeing 314 Clipper was a long-range flying boat produced by the Boeing Airplane Company between 1938 and 1941. One of the largest aircraft of the time, it used the massive wing of Boeing’s earlier XB-15 bomber prototype to achieve the range necessary for flights across the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Twelve Clippers were built; nine were brought into service for Pan Am and later transferred to the U.S. military. The remaining three were sold to British Overseas Airways Corporation (BOAC) by Pan Am and delivered in early 1941. (BOAC's 3 Short S.26 transoceanic flying-boats had been requisitioned by the RAF).



The flight of the then-named California Clipper began December 2, 1941 at the Pan Am base on Treasure Island, California for its scheduled passenger service to Auckland, New Zealand. Renamed the Pacific Clipper, it landed at Pan American's LaGuardia Field seaplane base at 7:12 on the morning of January 6, 1942.

NC18602 made scheduled stops in San Pedro, California, Honolulu, Hawaii, Canton Island, Suva, Fiji and Nouméa, New Caledonia en route to Auckland when Pearl Harbor was attacked.

Cut off from the United States due to the bombing of Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941 and commanding a valuable military asset, Captain Robert Ford was directed to strip company markings, registration and insignia from the Clipper and proceed in secret to the Marine Terminal, LaGuardia Field, New York.

Ford and his crew successfully flew over 31,500 miles to home via

Gladstone, Australia
Darwin, Australia
Surabaya, Java
Trincomalee, Ceylon
Karachi, British India
Bahrain
Khartoum, Sudan
Leopoldville, Belgian Congo
Natal, Brazil
Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago
New York, arriving January 6, 1942.

At Surabaya, Captain Ford had to refuel with automobile grade gasoline. "We took off from Surabaya on the 100 octane, climbed a couple of thousand feet, and pulled back the power to cool off the engines," said Ford. "Then we switched to the automobile gas and held our breaths. The engines almost jumped out of their mounts, but they ran. We figured it was either that or leave the airplane to the Japs."

On the way to Trincomalee, they were confronted by a Japanese submarine, and Ford had to jam the throttles forward to climb out of range of the submarine's guns. On Christmas Eve, when they took off, black oil began gushing out of the number 3 engine and pouring back over the wing. Ford shut down the engine and returned to Trincomalee. He discovered one of the engine's cylinders had failed.

When Captain Ford was planning his flight from Bahrain, he was warned by the British authorities not to fly across Arabia. Ford said, "The Saudis had apparently already caught some British flyers who had been forced down there. The natives had dug a hole, buried them in it up to their necks, and just left them." Ford flew right over Mecca because the Saudis did not have anti-aircraft guns.

A Pan American airport manager and a radio officer had been dispatched to meet the Clipper at Leopoldville. When Ford landed they handed him a cold beer. Ford said, "That was one of the high points of the whole trip." After NC18602 had completed its harrowing flight to safety, Pan Am renamed the aircraft the Pacific Clipper. The name change was mainly for publicity purposes, arising from the first newspaper articles having wrongly identified the aircraft. NC18602 remained the Pacific Clipper from 1942 throughout the remainder of its career. Purchased by the US Navy in 1946, it was subsequently sold to Universal Airlines but was damaged in a storm and ultimately salvaged for parts.

There is a lot more to this harrowing tale, including almost getting shot down by British fighters. Here are some more good links:

lapsedhistorian.com/long-way-round-part-1/

tranquilitybaseblog.blogspot.com/2013/03...-world-hard-way.html

geoscience.wisc.edu/~maher/pacclip.html


ʎɐqǝ uo pɹɐoqʎǝʞ ɐ ʎnq ı ǝɯıʇ ʇsɐן ǝɥʇ sı sıɥʇ
Last Edit: 10 months ago by LSUFan.

Re: Trivia Questions: increase your knowledge 9 months, 3 weeks ago #16702

How did Sears and Roebuck help start an American Christmas tradition, due in most part to a screw-up in one of it's ads in the 1950's?


ʎɐqǝ uo pɹɐoqʎǝʞ ɐ ʎnq ı ǝɯıʇ ʇsɐן ǝɥʇ sı sıɥʇ

Re: Trivia Questions: increase your knowledge 9 months, 2 weeks ago #16703

LSUFan wrote:
How did Sears and Roebuck help start an American Christmas tradition, due in most part to a screw-up in one of it's ads in the 1950's?


It started the tradition of NORAD tracking Santa Claus


"Don't write anything you can phone. Don't phone anything you can talk. Don't talk anything you can whisper. Don't whisper anything you can smile. Don't smile anything you can nod. Don't nod anything you can wink." Earl Long

Re: Trivia Questions: increase your knowledge 9 months, 2 weeks ago #16704

That is correct:



It was December 1955, the height of the Cold War, when the red phone on Col. Harry Shoup’s desk at the Continental Air Defense Command began to ring. Only an elite few knew the number. Odds were good that a four-star general from the Pentagon was on the other end of the line.

Shoup reached for the phone.

“Yes, sir. This is Col. Shoup,” he said.

No response.

“Sir? This is Col. Shoup.” Pause. “Sir, can you read me all right?”

That’s when Shoup heard the little girl’s voice.

“Are you really Santa Claus?”

For the last 60 years, officials at the North American Aerospace Defense Command at Peterson Air Force Base in Colorado Springs, Colo., have tracked Santa’s whirlwind tour across the globe to deliver presents on Christmas Eve. Nearly 9 million people from more than 200 countries are expected to check in with NORAD’s Santa-tracking website before they go to bed on Christmas Eve.

And it all began with that phone call.

As Shoup later recalled in a home video, his first response to the unlikely query was that someone was pulling his leg -- and he wasn’t amused.

"I said, 'Would you repeat that please?'" he replied.

“Are you really Santa Claus?”

That’s when he realized two things: Something had gone wrong with his phone, and the question was genuine.

So he told the little girl on the other end of the line that he was, indeed, Santa Claus. Relieved, she informed him that she would be leaving him food by her fireplace, plus treats for his reindeer as well.

“I said, ‘Oh boy, they sure will appreciate that!’”

Then Shoup asked to speak to her mother. That’s how he learned that a Sears, Roebuck & Co. advertisement in the local newspaper had invited kids to call Santa at ME 2-6681 -- the number for the red phone.

It was a misprint, of course, but that didn’t stop kids from flooding the line all the way until Christmas. Shoup assigned a couple of airmen to answer the line and act like St. Nick, Shoup’s daughter Pamela Farrell recounted to StoryCorps.

After a few weeks, someone at the Continental Air Defense Command (which is now NORAD) had an inspired idea. He went to the giant glass board where airmen tracked the planes in U.S. or Canadian airspace and added a drawing of a sleigh with eight reindeer. They were headed south from the North Pole.

Shoup studied the board. Then he picked up his phone, his other daughter, Terri Van Keuren, told StoryCorps.

“He called a local radio station and said, ‘This is the commander of the Combat Alert Center, and we have an unidentified flying object -- why, it looks like a sleigh!’”

After that, Van Keuren added, stations would call every hour to ask for the latest on Santa’s whereabouts.


The military’s Santa-tracking efforts have become considerably more elaborate since 1955. NORAD’s online tracker plays Christmas tunes while flying reindeer pull a red sleigh over images of the Earth provided by NASA. The site shows Santa’s last stop and gives an ETA for his next destination. It also keeps a running tab of the number of gifts delivered.

Those who find websites passé can download the NORAD Tracks Santa app from the iTunes store, follow @NoradSanta on Twitter, “like” NORAD’s tracker on Facebook or keep tabs through a variety of other social media sites.

More than 70,000 children still call NORAD to talk to Santa on a toll-free line -- (877) HI-NORAD or (877) 446-6723 -- and another 12,000 or so send e-mails to noradtrackssanta@outlook.com.

All of this would have been impossible for Shoup to imagine as he spoke to the little girl who inadvertently kicked the whole thing off 60 years ago.

Before handing the phone to her mother, the girl asked a question that was certainly appropriate for an Air Force colonel: How is it possible for Santa to visit so many houses in a single night?

Years later, Shoup still remembered his answer: “I said, ‘That’s the magic of Christmas.’”



www.npr.org/2014/12/19/371647099/norads-...ypo-and-a-good-sport

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NORAD_Tracks_Santa

www.snopes.com/holidays/christmas/santa/norad.asp


ʎɐqǝ uo pɹɐoqʎǝʞ ɐ ʎnq ı ǝɯıʇ ʇsɐן ǝɥʇ sı sıɥʇ
Last Edit: 9 months, 2 weeks ago by LSUFan.

Re: Trivia Questions: increase your knowledge 9 months, 2 weeks ago #16705

When Holly Ridge, LA was established in 1908, what was manufactured at the sawmill there?


ʎɐqǝ uo pɹɐoqʎǝʞ ɐ ʎnq ı ǝɯıʇ ʇsɐן ǝɥʇ sı sıɥʇ

Re: Trivia Questions: increase your knowledge 9 months, 2 weeks ago #16706

I'll drink to that

Re: Trivia Questions: increase your knowledge 9 months, 2 weeks ago #16707

HISTORY OF HOLLY RIDGE

IN 1908 CHESS AND WYMOND COMPANY OF LOUISIANA PURCHASED
six THOUSAND ACRES OFWHITE OAK TIMBER FROM THE CALHOUN
INTEREST. THIS COVERED THE AREA WHICH IS NOW THE PRESENT
SITE OF HOLLY RIDGE. THEY STARTED A PORTABLE SAWMILL ABOUT
ONE MILE EAST OF HOLLY RIDGE WHERE WHITE OAK HEADING WAS CUT
FOR USE IN MAKING WHISKEY BARRELS

Re: Trivia Questions: increase your knowledge 9 months, 1 week ago #16711

We have two barrels that were made there. James' dad worked there for years. Barrel heads were made there and the staves were made in Tallulah.

Re: Trivia Questions: increase your knowledge 9 months, 1 week ago #16712

What does Adam & Eves, Panda Bears, and Hell's Angels all have in common?


ʎɐqǝ uo pɹɐoqʎǝʞ ɐ ʎnq ı ǝɯıʇ ʇsɐן ǝɥʇ sı sıɥʇ

Re: Trivia Questions: increase your knowledge 9 months, 1 week ago #16713

Flying Tiger squadrons I believe

Re: Trivia Questions: increase your knowledge 9 months, 1 week ago #16714

The Flying Tigers comprised three squadrons:

1st Squadron - "Adam and Eves"
2nd Squadron - "Panda Bears"
3rd Squadron - "Hell's Angels"

Re: Trivia Questions: increase your knowledge 9 months, 1 week ago #16715

Yep, it was the squadrons of the infamous American Volunteer Group (AVG) Flying Tigers led by our own local Gen. Claire Lee Chennault.

#1 son and I once again visited the Chennault Aviation Museum in Monroe last Saturday, and they have added even more exhibits since our last visit. if you get the opportunity, I cannot recommend enough that those reading this, visit this great museum we have here in Northeast Louisiana.

www.arlingtoncemetery.net/clchenna.htm


ʎɐqǝ uo pɹɐoqʎǝʞ ɐ ʎnq ı ǝɯıʇ ʇsɐן ǝɥʇ sı sıɥʇ

Re: Trivia Questions: increase your knowledge 9 months, 1 week ago #16716

Another bit of interesting Flying Tiger history is that one of their aces (10 victories) was Charles Older.... who graduated from the University of Southern California law school.



Although that name may not instantly ring a bell with, you do know some other piece of grim history he was involved in years later as a judge.

He was the presiding judge at the Charles Manson murder trial



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