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Trivia Questions: increase your knowledge
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TOPIC: Trivia Questions: increase your knowledge

Re: Trivia Questions: increase your knowledge 10 months, 3 weeks ago #16666

I don't believe he is in there. I think he escaped.


"Don't write anything you can phone. Don't phone anything you can talk. Don't talk anything you can whisper. Don't whisper anything you can smile. Don't smile anything you can nod. Don't nod anything you can wink." Earl Long

Re: Trivia Questions: increase your knowledge 10 months, 3 weeks ago #16667

I read that, but didn't see it as the answer to the question--I didn't realize the magician society would spurn her because she was buried in a Catholic cemetery. They were a fascinating couple.

Edit: Actually, now that I consider it, it may not be the magicians spurned her, but that the Catholics didn't want anything made of it in their cemetery. I can remember as a child (raised Catholic) that we weren't "allowed" to watch any shows remotely dealing with magic, witchcraft, etc, Not even Bewitched with Samantha twitching her nose, LOL. (I watched it anyway.)
Last Edit: 10 months, 3 weeks ago by GoldBugGirl.

Re: Trivia Questions: increase your knowledge 10 months, 3 weeks ago #16668

They don't spurn her, and would be glad to take care of her grave, if she was buried alongside her husband (which is why they don't). They do not need to maintain her gravesite, as the cemetery she is in, doesn't need any maintenance........... nor is she by herself, in the same reverence as the famous Harry Houdini.

It's not a matter of being spurned, just logistics. The real reason they don't take care of her grave is she is not buried alongside her husband..... even though she was meant to be.


ʎɐqǝ uo pɹɐoqʎǝʞ ɐ ʎnq ı ǝɯıʇ ʇsɐן ǝɥʇ sı sıɥʇ
Last Edit: 10 months, 3 weeks ago by LSUFan.

Re: Trivia Questions: increase your knowledge 10 months, 1 week ago #16675

Okay this is for you Beemer's and what you know (or think you know) about the company logo/roundel.

Although the logo/roundel has been thru some minor changes, it's been relatively the same since it's inception in 1917.



Although many sites, articles, and even some BMW employee/historians have stated that the blue and white roundel go back to the days when BMW made aircraft engines....and the roundel represents a spinning airplane propeller in a blue sky...... this is incorrect and just folklore mostly due to an advertisement from the late twenties..

The real history is much simpler. What does the blue and white roundel represent?


ʎɐqǝ uo pɹɐoqʎǝʞ ɐ ʎnq ı ǝɯıʇ ʇsɐן ǝɥʇ sı sıɥʇ
Last Edit: 10 months, 1 week ago by LSUFan.

Re: Trivia Questions: increase your knowledgehttp: 10 months, 1 week ago #16676

From bmwdrives.com:
"It was on 5 October 1917 that the BMW trademark was registered with the Imperial Trade Mark Roll under No. 221388. It featured the circular design of the Rapp logo but with the letters BMW at the top of the outer ring. The inner featured quadrants in the Bavarian Free State colors of blue and white - but in the opposed order - as it was illegal to use national symbols in a commercial trademark."

Which got me interested in Bavaria's flag:
Flag of Bavaria
(sorry, I can't get the photos to load)





Bavaria is one of the oldest states of Europe dating back to Roman times. In the Middle Ages it was established as a duchy, and eventually the Duke of Bavaria became a Prince-elector of the Holy Roman Empire. The Kingdom of Bavaria existed from 1806 to 1918, and after that Bavaria became a free state (republic), formally the Free State of Bavaria, located in the southeast of Germany.

The Flag of Bavaria consists of an array of blue and white lozenges (diamond-shaped objects (charges) that are placed on the field of the shield or flag. The lozenges are usually somewhat narrower than they are tall.
Last Edit: 10 months, 1 week ago by GoldBugGirl.

Re: Trivia Questions: increase your knowledge 10 months, 1 week ago #16677

Judy got it.

BMW is the acronym for Bayerische Motoren Werke AG which is German for Bavarian Motor Works.

bmwmcmag.com/2013/01/origins-of-the-bmw-...ning-propeller-myth/

The BMW Roundel was actually registered more than 95 years ago and has since gone on to become one of the world’s most recognized commercial symbols. Many people believe the design is connected with aircraft engines because of the apparent ‘spinning propellers’ but this is just a myth, as the interesting history of the Roundel reveals…

In July 1917, Franz Josef Popp registered the name Bayerische Motoren Werke, thus distancing the new company from the former Rapp Motorenwerke aero engine company. This was a necessary move if the new company was to find new clients and prosper. While the name was registered there wasn’t yet a new logo.

It was on October 5, 1917 the BMW trademark was registered with the Imperial Trade Mark Roll under No. 221388. It featured the circular design of the Rapp logo but with the letters BMW at the top of the outer ring. The inner quadrants featured the Bavarian Free State colors of blue and white – but in the opposite order – as it was illegal to use national symbols in a commercial trademark.

The design was not in any way connected with aircraft engines or propellers. The idea that the blue and white had anything to do with spinning propellers comes from a 1929 advertisement, which featured aircraft with the image of the Roundel in the rotating propellers. This advertisement came at the beginning of the Great Depression, which coincided with BMW acquiring the license to build Pratt & Whitney radial aircraft engines. The advertising department used the Roundel and BMW heritage in an attempt to increase sales of the new radial motors.



The idea of the spinning propellers was given greater credence in an article by Wilhelm Farrenkopf in a BMW journal of 1942. This also featured an image of an aircraft with a spinning Roundel. These were powerful images and the legend of the spinning propeller was born.

While the logo was registered on October 5, it was in limited use prior to this date. On October 1, 1917, Franz Josef Popp was given a certificate confirming his appointment as General Manager and it was adorned with the now familiar BMW Roundel.

The basic structure of the Roundel has remained the same over 90 years but there have been subtle changes. In the original design the lettering and outline was in gold but by the time the first BMW motorcycle, the R32, was released in 1923 it had changed slightly. The letters were still in gold but the font was bolder and letters closer together. This was the style that was submitted to the German Register of Trade Marks in 1933, and the international register of trademarks in 1934. This did not however stop various versions being used.

One of the early BMW advertisements using the logo was in 1918 with the ‘Falling Roundels’, this was a positioning advertisement that was designed to establish the brand and give an indication to its current and future products.



Subsequent advertisements, posters and even cars and motorcycles also featured many styles of Roundel. The proportions changed, the shade of blue used, and the lettering could be in gold, white or silver with serif or sans-serif fonts in different sizes. There appears to be no reason for this variance except for product designers and marketing and communication staff using personal choice depending on application.

There was a subsequent change to a slightly bolder font and this has remained as the standard Roundel. There was flirtation with a ‘Motorsport Roundel’ in the early 1970s and ’80s which had the standard logo surrounded by the BMW Motorsport colors. In 1997 BMW moved to having the Roundel depicted in 3-D when used in the printed form. This gives the Roundel a new bolder and dynamic look.

The BMW Roundel is now ranked in the top 10 of the world’s most recognized commercial logos and is an iconic symbol in its own right. The original design, in its simplicity and symbolism has stood the test of time.

Through the 1950s there was a more concerted effort to standardize the Roundel. The use of white lettering was now standard and when used on cars and motorcycles it was silver. By the 1960s the serif font was replaced by sans-serif, and this was used on all motorcycles by 1966.

Judy, here is your Bavarian flag, which BMW gets it's roundel colors from;



I now wonder if Judy secretly has a Beemer she doesn't let us see, as she knows we'll want to ride in it.


ʎɐqǝ uo pɹɐoqʎǝʞ ɐ ʎnq ı ǝɯıʇ ʇsɐן ǝɥʇ sı sıɥʇ
Last Edit: 10 months, 1 week ago by LSUFan.

Re: Trivia Questions: increase your knowledge 10 months, 1 week ago #16678

I had always planned for this to be actually a two part trivia question. Now that we know what BMW's logo stands for, let's go to the second one.

Why does Audi have four interlocking rings in their logo?'



ʎɐqǝ uo pɹɐoqʎǝʞ ɐ ʎnq ı ǝɯıʇ ʇsɐן ǝɥʇ sı sıɥʇ
Last Edit: 10 months, 1 week ago by LSUFan.

Re: Trivia Questions: increase your knowledge 10 months, 1 week ago #16679

The Audi badge the 'Four Rings' is the emblem of one of the oldest car manufacturers in Germany. It symbolises the 1932 merger of the four independent motor-vehicle manufacturers: Audi, DKW, Horch and Wanderer. Together with the NSU brand, which joined in 1969, these companies are the roots of the present-day AUDI AG. After the war the Audi name - which is Latin for "Hear!" - disappeared, but was revived in 1965, using the four rings as a logo. Also, the name is sort of a pun on 'hoerch', German for 'hear', name of one of the founders. The company itself is more than a century old.

Re: Trivia Questions: increase your knowledge 10 months, 1 week ago #16680

Good deal, Tom. You are correct.



Another interesting bit of trivia is that the Olympics actually sued Audi in 1995 over the use of the rings, but the Olympics lost.

www.autoevolution.com/news/audi-reveals-updated-logo-10315.html


ʎɐqǝ uo pɹɐoqʎǝʞ ɐ ʎnq ı ǝɯıʇ ʇsɐן ǝɥʇ sı sıɥʇ
Last Edit: 10 months, 1 week ago by LSUFan.

Re: Trivia Questions: increase your knowledge 10 months, 1 week ago #16682

Where was the last shot of the US Civil War fired at?


Hint 1: It wasn't in Texas


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Re: Trivia Questions: increase your knowledge 10 months ago #16683

the CSS Shenandoah story

this was an amazing story
Last Edit: 10 months ago by fishingmcman.

Re: Trivia Questions: increase your knowledge 10 months ago #16684

Tom got who fired it, but not where it was fired.

The last shot of the Civil War was fired by the CSS Shenandoah in the Bering Sea off the coast of Alaska. It's a pretty intriguing tale with international implications, charges of piracy, and a race/chase around the world as the ship attempted to get back to it's home port in England......... yes, you read that right, England.

The vessel had three names and many owners in her lifetime of nine years. She had been designed as an auxiliary composite passenger cargo vessel of 1,018 tons being built in 1863 by Alexander Stephen & Sons, Glasgow, Scotland, for Robertson & Co., Glasgow to be named Sea King. The vessel was intended for the East Asia tea trade and as a troop transport. On being fitted out at the builders the Northern Union assessed the ship for purchase. After change of owner and a number trips to the Far East carrying cargo and to New Zealand transporting troops to the Maori War, the Confederate Navy assessed and purchased her from Wallace Bros of Liverpool in secret with the signing on 18 October 1864, one day before being renamed CSS Shenandoah. The ship was to be converted into an armed cruiser with a mission to capture and destroy Union merchant ships.

Sea King sailed from London on 8 October 1864, ostensibly for Bombay, India, on a trading voyage. The supply steamer Laurel sailed from Liverpool the same day. The two ships rendezvoused at Funchal, Madeira, with the Laurel carrying the officers and the nucleus of the commerce raider's crew, together with naval guns, ammunition, and ship's stores. Her commander, Lieutenant James Iredell Waddell supervised her conversion to a man-o-war in nearby waters. However, Waddell was barely able to bring his crew to even half strength, despite additional volunteers from the merchant sailors on the Sea King and from Laurel.

The Confederate cruiser was commissioned on 19 October 1864, lowering the Union Jack and raising the "Stainless Banner", and renaming the vessel CSS Shenandoah.

CSS Shenandoah headed for the Pacific Ocean via the Indian Ocean. En route to the Cape, the Confederates captured six prizes. Five were burned or scuttled, once the crew and passengers had been removed. The sixth was bonded and used to transport the prisoners to Bahia, Brazil, where they were released.

Shenandoah took only one prize in the Indian Ocean, but hunting became more profitable after refitting in Melbourne. En route to the North Pacific whaling grounds, on April 3–4, Waddell burned four whalers in the Caroline Islands. After a 3-week cruise to the ice and fog of the Sea of Okhotsk yielded only a single prize, due to a warning which had preceded him, Waddell headed north past the Aleutian Islands into the Bering Sea and the Arctic Ocean. Shenandoah then proceeded to capture 11 more prizes.

On June 27, 1865, he learned from a prize, the Susan & Abigail, that General Robert E. Lee had surrendered his Army of Northern Virginia. Her captain produced a San Francisco newspaper reporting the flight from Richmond, Virginia, of the Confederate Government 10 weeks previously. However, the newspaper also contained Confederate President Jefferson Davis's proclamation that the "war would be carried on with re-newed vigor." Waddell then captured 10 more whalers in the space of 7 hours just below the Arctic Circle.

On August 3, 1865, Waddell finally learned of the war's end when he met at sea the Liverpool barque Barracouta, which was bound for San Francisco. He received the devastating news of the surrender of General Joseph E. Johnston's army on April 26, Kirby Smith's army's surrender on May 26, and crucially the capture of President Davis and a part of his cabinet. Captain Waddell then knew the war over.

Captain Waddell lowered his Confederate flag, and the CSS Shenandoah underwent physical alteration. Her guns were dismounted and stored below deck, and her hull was painted, while still at sea, to look like an ordinary merchant vessel.

Regardless of Davis's proclamation and knowing the unreliability of newspapers at the time, Captain Waddell and the crew knew returning to a US port would mean facing a Union court with a Northern perspective of the war. They predicted that doing so would run the risk of being tried in a US court and hanged as pirates. Commerce raiders were not included in the reconciliation and amnesty that Confederate soldiers were given. Captain Raphael Semmes of CSS Alabama escaped charges of piracy by surrendering May 1, 1865, as an army general under Joseph E. Johnston. Semmes's former sailors surrendered as artillerymen.

Captain Waddell decided to surrender his ship at the unofficial home port of Liverpool, where Confederate Commander Bulloch was stationed.

CSS Shenandoah sailed from off the west coast of Mexico via Cape Horn to Liverpool, a voyage of three months and over 9,000 nautical miles, being pursued by Union vessels. CSS Shenandoah anchored at the Mersey Bar at the mouth of the estuary awaiting a pilot to board to guide the ship up the river and into the enclosed docks. Not flying any flag, the pilot refused to take the ship into Liverpool unless they flew a flag. The crew raised the Confederate flag. CSS Shenandoah sailed up the River Mersey with the flag fully flying to crowds on the riverbanks.

HMS Donegal happened to be anchored in mid-river between Toxteth in Liverpool and Tranmere in Birkenhead. Captain Waddell maneuvered his ship near to the British man-of-war dropping anchor. The CSS Shenandoah was surrendered by Captain Waddell to Captain Paynter of HMS Donegal on 6 November 1865. The Confederate flag was lowered again for the very last time, under the watch of a Royal Navy detachment and the crew.

CSS Shenandoah had struck her colors twice. This marked the last surrender of the American Civil War and the last official lowering of the Confederate flag. The very last act of the Civil War was Captain Waddell walking up the steps of Liverpool Town Hall with a letter to present to the mayor surrendering his vessel to the British government. In so doing, the Shenandoah became the only Confederate warship to circumnavigate the globe.

After the surrender of Shenandoah to the British government, a decision had to be made of what to do with the Confederate crew, knowing the consequences of piracy charges. Clearly many of the crew originated from the United Kingdom and its colonies and three had swum ashore in the cold November waters fearing the worst.

After a full investigation by law officers of the Crown, it was decided that the officers and crew did not infringe the rules of war or the laws of nations to justify being held as prisoners, so they were unconditionally released. But the ramifications continued. The Union demanded Waddell be arrested. Britain declined. The U.S. brought history's first international civil court cases, known collectively as "the Alabama Claims" after the most famous Confederate sloop.

The Alabama, sunk in battle off the coast of France in 1864, inflicted more damage than the Shenandoah, with some 60 kills. But the Shenandoah was more notorious because of the sneaky way the British had supplied it.

Adding to that insult was the fact that the Alaska attacks happened so long after the rest of the South had surrendered, the daring escape that humiliated the most powerful military machine in the western hemisphere and the international incident involving Waddell's immunity in England.

The effect of the Shenandoah was greater than the Alabama, It had more long-term effects and actually changed the balance of power at sea.

And not in America's favor.

The raiders' depredations had caused insurance rates for American shippers to skyrocket. Many went out of business. The British bought cargo vessels from bankrupt companies at pennies on the dollar. American shipping, which had boomed before the war, languished for years after and Britannia continued to rule the waves until the age of the U-boats.

Following the precedent-setting international arbitration, conducted in Geneva, Switzerland, Britain agreed to pay the U.S. $15.5 million in damages -- twice what America paid Russia for Alaska.

"For that, England got control of world shipping for another 50 years. It was an incredible bargain.

Tempers cooled. The Shenandoah's officers returned to America where several had successful careers. Waddell continued to command ships, receiving high praise for his abilities. He died in 1886.

Seventy-six years later, the U.S. Navy christened a guided missile destroyer in his honor, the USS Waddell.

www.militaryfactory.com/ships/detail-pag...=CSS-Shenandoah-1864

www.adn.com/our-alaska/article/civil-war...ring-sea/2011/04/17/

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CSS_Shenandoah

www.css-shenandoah.com/Shenandoah%20History.pdf


ʎɐqǝ uo pɹɐoqʎǝʞ ɐ ʎnq ı ǝɯıʇ ʇsɐן ǝɥʇ sı sıɥʇ
Last Edit: 10 months ago by LSUFan.

Re: Trivia Questions: increase your knowledge 10 months ago #16685

What was the first commercial flight to fly around the world?

Hint: It wasn't by choice


ʎɐqǝ uo pɹɐoqʎǝʞ ɐ ʎnq ı ǝɯıʇ ʇsɐן ǝɥʇ sı sıɥʇ

Re: Trivia Questions: increase your knowledge 10 months ago #16686

August 13th is a big day in music history. "You Ain't Nothin' but a Hound Dog" was recorded on that date. Who recorded it?


"Don't write anything you can phone. Don't phone anything you can talk. Don't talk anything you can whisper. Don't whisper anything you can smile. Don't smile anything you can nod. Don't nod anything you can wink." Earl Long

Re: Trivia Questions: increase your knowledge 10 months ago #16687

"Hound Dog" is a twelve-bar blues song written by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller. Recorded originally by Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton on August 13, 1952 in Los Angeles and released by Peacock Records in late February 1953, "Hound Dog" was Thornton's only hit record, selling over 500,000 copies, spending 14 weeks in the R&B charts, including seven weeks at #1. Thornton's recording of "Hound Dog" is listed as one of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's "500 Songs That Shaped Rock and Roll", and was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in February 2013.
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